Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Hans Pennink / AP

New York Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul says, “There’s no tolerance for harassment in the workplace.” This follows revelations that a former state official paid $50,000 to a woman who says he sexually harassed her.

Darron Cummings / AP

Next week on Election Day, New Yorkers will decide whether or not to hold a constitutional convention. If they say yes, it will be the first one in about 80 years and would open up the state's constitution to revision.

Mike Groll / AP

Wall Street profits are up by one-third over the same period last year, says the New York State comptroller. Comptroller Tom DiNapoli says the gain of $12.3 billion is good news for New Yorkers with retirement accounts invested in the market, as well as the state’s pension fund.

M. Spencer Green / AP

There’s some misinformation on social media regarding a key ballot item in next month’s elections on whether to hold a constitutional convention.

Ted S. Warren / AP

New Yorkers who use e-cigarettes will have to comply with the same limits on smoking in public that apply to regular cigarettes, now that Governor Cuomo has signed a bill into law. But anti-smoking advocates say more needs to be done to combat the rising use of the nicotine product.

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