Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Mike Groll / AP

The business of the evenly divided New York State Senate remains stalled, as advocacy groups pressed for their bills to be acted on before the session ends in two weeks.

Hans Pennink / AP

In a spirited floor fight in the State Senate, Democrats tried once again but failed to get a vote on and amendment on women’s reproductive healthcare. The argument over Senate procedure led to accusations that some Republican senators were trying to “mansplain” the rules to the state’s female lieutenant governor.

Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Governor Cuomo has proposed an expansion to his Extreme Risk Protection Order bill to give teachers the power to go to court to prevent a student’s access to guns, if they suspect the student might bring a gun to school and potentially engage in a school shooting.

Frank Franklin II / AP

Democratic candidate for governor and actor Cynthia Nixon came to the Capitol to talk about the need for more education aid and what she says is Governor Cuomo’s failings in that policy area. Meanwhile, Cuomo’s campaign says it’s Nixon who is being inconsistent.

Tim Roske / AP

The New York State Senate is experiencing its worst gridlock in nine years, with the two major factions tied at 31 members each. No legislation is moving through the chamber, but there’s lots of finger pointing.  

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