Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

Supporters of paid family leave in New York hope 2016 will be their year, but business groups are urging caution.  

A bill that would allow all workers in the state 12 weeks of paid leave to take care of a new baby or sick family member was approved in the State Assembly, and two bills gained support in the State Senate, but the issue fell by the wayside in the end of session rush to pass bills and adjourn for the summer. 

AP Photo/Kathy Willens

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's Women's Equality Act saw some successes in the legislature in 2015, after the most controversial of the measures, an abortion rights provision, were separated out from the rest of the items.

Eight of the of the ten provisions in the Women's Equality Act passed in 2015, including anti-human trafficking laws, protections for pregnant workers, broadening anti-sexual harassment laws in the workplace, and making it easier for women to sue for equal pay, said the co-chair of the Women's Equality Coalition, Suzy Ballantyne.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

In the legislative session that recently ended, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo saw the state legislature reject a number of agenda items he’d been pushing. The governor, perhaps taking a cue from President Obama, has used his executive powers to advance some of the proposals anyway.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

New York State’s new education commissioner, MaryEllen Elia, has been on the job just over a week, and she’s been traveling the state on a listening tour to reach out to teachers, school boards and others who’ve been buffeted by an intense political climate during the most recent legislative session. She recently attended a meeting of the Rural Schools Association in Cooperstown.

Matt Ryan

New York's Lieutenant Governor, Kathy Hochul, said she’s not harboring ambitions to be the state’s first woman governor.

Pages