Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Mike Groll / AP

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders hope to finalize a state budget before a Friday deadline.

Karen DeWitt / WSHU News

Lawmakers worked toward a budget deal on Monday as New York Governor Andrew Cuomo indicated he’s making some concessions on the minimum wage.

Karen DeWit / WSHU

Top State University of New York (SUNY) officials say they want a tuition freeze at the state’s colleges and universities. They are asking Governor Cuomo and the state legislature to adequately fund SUNY in the budget so that they don’t have to raise rates for students. The request comes as lawmakers are scrambling to meet a March 31st budget deadline.

Chairman of the SUNY Board of Trustees Carl McCall says the board and its chancellor don’t want to raise tuition, and they want Governor Cuomo and the legislature to help them avoid it.

Mark Lennihan / AP

New York State became the last state in the nation to legalize mixed martial arts (MMA), following a 113-25 vote in the Assembly on Tuesday. The bill was placed on the floor for a vote after a majority of Democrats backed the legislation.

Karen DeWit / WSHU News

The newly elected Chancellor to the Board of Regents, Betty Rosa, expressed grave doubts about the state’s use of standardized tests in the schools, saying if she were not on the Board of Regents, she would join the opt-out movement and not permit her children to take the tests.

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