Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Two years ago, New York State banned hydro-fracking of natural gas within the state’s borders. But a group of Cornell scientists who study the effects of climate change say New Yorkers are using more natural gas than ever.

Mike Groll / AP

A committee of the state Board of Regents recommends spending $2.1 billion more on schools in the new state budget, saying it’s time to continue an effort begun a decade ago to funnel more money to the state’s poorest school districts.

Evan Vucci / AP

President-elect Donald Trump has promised to repeal the Affordable Health Care Act, also known as Obamacare, and replace it with something else. While no one really knows what that means, one health care analyst with a prominent Albany think tank says New York could be billions of dollars in the hole as a result.

Alexander F. Yuan / AP

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has released a package of bills aimed at improving what he says is the state’s “arcane” and “ridiculous” voting laws that bar many potential voters from the ballot box.

Schneiderman began a statewide inquiry after his office received a record number of complaints about lack of voter access during the April presidential primary.

Pete Dzintars / Flickr

New York State lawmakers are considering whether to have a special session this month to vote on, among other things, a pay raise.

Assembly Democrats are holding three days of meetings aimed in part on whether they should gavel into session later this month to vote to give themselves their first pay raise in nearly two decades.

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