Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

New York State’s new education commissioner, MaryEllen Elia, has been on the job just over a week, and she’s been traveling the state on a listening tour to reach out to teachers, school boards and others who’ve been buffeted by an intense political climate during the most recent legislative session. She recently attended a meeting of the Rural Schools Association in Cooperstown.

Matt Ryan

New York's Lieutenant Governor, Kathy Hochul, said she’s not harboring ambitions to be the state’s first woman governor.

(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has appointed the state Attorney General as a temporary special prosecutor to oversee cases where a civilian is killed by a police officer.

(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law a bill to crack down on sexual assaults on college campuses, saying he hopes other states will adopt similar protections.

The agreement on the bill was a bright spot in the close of a legislative session that saw lawmakers punt on a number of other key issues.

When Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders announced a new rebate check for property taxpayers, they touted it as a significant “real” benefit to average homeowners. But fiscal watchdog groups say the program is severely flawed, and the money could be better used on something else.