Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has been getting some bipartisan criticism from state lawmakers over an email policy that erases all electronic correspondence of state employees after 90 days.

The policy to delete the emails of state employees after three months has been in place for some time, but is only now being enforced. It was revealed during a recent budget hearing, where Governor Cuomo’s chief Information Officer Maggie Miller testified before skeptical state lawmakers .

Jenna Flanagan

It was the charter schools’ turn to rally at the State Capitol Wednesday in support of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposal to allow 100 more charter schools in New York.

Thousands of charter school students on 450 buses, along with their parents and teachers, came to Albany for a rally that was billed by organizers as a school field trip. They heard nearly two hours of speeches, watched dance performances, and saw celebrities like Grammy winning singer Ashanti.

Among the speakers, Senate Republican Leader Dean Skelos of Long Island, and Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Newly elected Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie made clear one of his top priorities in his first news conference, where he called for passage of the Dream Act, which would offer college aid to children of undocumented immigrants.

Speaker Heastie  says when it comes to helping young New Yorkers with paying for college, there’s a double standard.

AP Photo/Tim Roske

Democrats in the New York State Senate are pushing for some reforms that directly address problems that led to the arrest and resignation of the Assembly Speaker. They want to virtually ban all outside income for lawmakers.

The proposals come two-and-a-half weeks after the Democratic Assembly Speaker, Sheldon Silver, was arrested on corruption charges, and one week after he resigned as speaker.

Silver is charged with subverting his employment at two private law firms to gain nearly $6 million dollars in kickbacks and bribes.

AP Photo/Mike Groll

Carl Heastie was elected unanimously by Democrats in the Assembly to be the next Speaker, less than two weeks after former Speaker Sheldon Silver was arrested and charged with  running a massive, multi-million dollar corruption scheme.

Heastie, the first African American speaker in the Assembly’s 237 year history, gave a brief speech to the chamber, where he  focused on moving on from the scandal brought on the Assembly by his predecessor. Heastie says the members have told him- they want change.

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