Kate Remington

Music Director, Classical music program host

Born in Madison, Wisconsin, Kate Remington received a degree in piano performance and mass communication from the University of Wisconsin. Her first radio position was with Wisconsin Public Radio, which included a wildly successful request program on Saturday mornings. She then moved to Chicago to join the fledgling nationally-distributed, Beethoven Satellite Network, originating from WFMT. Then Kate set out for Vermont Public Radio, to become the chief announcer there. In Vermont Kate met her husband, Dick Roberts, and that's where their son, Sam was born.  Kate and her family relocated to Fairfield to join WSHU in December of 2000, and she's been WSHU's Music Director since 2002.

When she's not on the air, Kate can usually be found at a stable in Monroe, CT, where she trains her horse, Tonka, in dressage.

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Classical Music Highlights
1:00 am
Mon December 1, 2014

Hey, Cheapskate!

Mozart broke his own rule about not writing music for the flute, when he was approached by a French nobleman who wanted a concerto.  Unfortunately, the aristocrat never paid  for it!  We'll enjoy the Flute and Harp Concerto this morning. 

Classical Music Highlights
1:00 am
Fri November 28, 2014

Need some Quiet Time?

This morning we've got the perfect music to help you recover from all the festivities yesterday, including Debussy's  tranquil impression of Reflections in the Water.  

Classical Music Highlights
1:00 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Home for Thanksgiving

Our music today will be a great soundtrack for your Thanksgiving holiday.  We're featuring pieces by American composers all day.  

Classical Music Highlights
1:00 am
Wed November 26, 2014

From Admiring Composer to talented Musician

Today, we'll enjoy a couple of great examples of how music is written for a talented performer by an admiring composer, including Mozart's Clarinet Concerto.  

Classical Music Highlights
12:00 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Helene Grimaud vs. Brahms

Brahms vowed to write a piano concerto that would be unplayable by a women, but he didn't count on the virtuosity of Helene Grimaud.  Tonigh we'll enjoy her performance of Brahms First Concerto.

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