Mark Herz

WSHU All Things Considered host, senior editor

Mark started his romance with journalism in his last year at Yale, where he majored in linguistics. Then, it was on to Columbia for a M.S. at the Graduate School of Journalism, where he reported from ground zero on Sept. 11. A Connecticut native, he was also a newspaper and public radio reporter for a time in Northern Arizona. Mark has won numerous state, regional, and national awards for both his reporting and interviewing. During his time at WSHU he's won national awards in 2013 and 2012. And in 2011, he won a National Edward R. Murrow Award for his series, "Policing the Mentally Ill.”

Alex J. Berliner / ABImages

Connecticut native Norman Lear changed the face of TV. And he did it in part by changing the faces on TV.

On his groundbreaking sitcoms, he brought us the bigoted Archie Bunker of All in the Family, a brash feminist in Maude, the upwardly mobile African-American The Jeffersons, and the struggling Black family in the projects of Good Times—and that’s just to name a very few.

Courtesy Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The Windham-Campbell literary festival is going on in New Haven this week. Eight writers from around the globe are being honored, having been surprised with prestigious awards that grant them $150,000 each. Here are the voices of a few of them—John Vaillant, Aminatta Forna, and Nadeem Aslam—speaking about their prizewinning work:

AP Images

Showtime's Masters of Sex is in its second season. The show dramatizes the lives of pioneering sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson. Actress Lizzy Caplan was nominated for a Primetime Emmy for her role as Virginia Johnson.

Biographer Thomas Maier wrote the book Masters of Sex, which the TV series is based on. He lives and works on Long Island, where in addition to being an author, he's an investigative reporter for Newsday. He spoke with WSHU's Mark Herz.

Kate Uhry

All of us may love when a feeling of inspiration infuses our work. Best-selling novelist and memoirist Dani Shapiro looks back on 20 years of facing the blank page—and teaching others about her craft—and says she's learned that for us all it's really about showing up, and following a trail of "breadcrumbs through a forest," as it were.

WSHU's Mark Herz talks to Shapiro about her latest book, Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of a Creative Life.

Anastasia Zinkerman

Ospreys are majestic birds of prey that live along Long Island Sound.

You might see them flying back to their nests high up on platforms—a fish dangling from the talons of their long legs, they glide in on wide wings to feed their young.

But forty years ago, you would’ve had almost no chance to see these eagle-like birds with their 5-foot wingspans.

WSHU's Mark Herz went to the Connecticut Audubon Society in Milford to find out how that happened, and how they’re doing now. 

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