Mark Herz

WSHU All Things Considered host, senior editor

Mark started his romance with journalism in his last year at Yale, where he majored in linguistics. Then, it was on to Columbia for a M.S. at the Graduate School of Journalism, where he reported from ground zero on Sept. 11. A Connecticut native, he was also a newspaper and public radio reporter for a time in Northern Arizona. Mark has won numerous state, regional, and national awards for both his reporting and interviewing. During his time at WSHU he's won national awards in 2013 and 2012. And in 2011, he won a National Edward R. Murrow Award for his series, "Policing the Mentally Ill.”

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

The winter storm that hit the region brought more than two feet of snow to the East End of Long Island and parts of Southeastern Connecticut.

New York officials say storm cleanup equipment is being moved to Eastern Long Island, where it's needed most.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday that about 500 pieces of equipment, including plows, dump trunks, and front end loaders were on their way to Suffolk County from New York City and the mid-Hudson Valley.

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone said Tuesday it will take a few days to get all that snow cleared out.

AP Photo

Peter, Paul and Mary, the iconic folk group of the 1960s, were renowned for their harmonies and their activism.  The group has a new book out,  Peter, Paul and Mary: 50 Years of Music and Life.

WSHU's Mark Herz spoke with Peter Yarrow about the group and its legacy.

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

In December of 2013, an engineer fell asleep while driving a Metro-North train in the Bronx.  It derailed, killing 4 people. 

The NTSB released a report on Wednesday with safety recommendations.  Among those recommendations is that railroads should routinely screen employees who perform "safety-sensitive" functions for sleep disorders.

NTSB Chairman Christopher Hart says they've made the recommendation to regulators of all transportation industries. He says, for example, it’s been helpful for the trucking industry.

Alex J. Berliner / ABImages

Connecticut native Norman Lear changed the face of TV. And he did it in part by changing the faces on TV.

On his groundbreaking sitcoms, he brought us the bigoted Archie Bunker of All in the Family, a brash feminist in Maude, the upwardly mobile African-American The Jeffersons, and the struggling Black family in the projects of Good Times—and that’s just to name a very few.

Courtesy Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The Windham-Campbell literary festival is going on in New Haven this week. Eight writers from around the globe are being honored, having been surprised with prestigious awards that grant them $150,000 each. Here are the voices of a few of them—John Vaillant, Aminatta Forna, and Nadeem Aslam—speaking about their prizewinning work: